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Aerial view of corn maze

Lee County corn maze
honors Extension centennial

Gross Farms in Lee County will join N.C. Cooperative Extension’s centennial celebration this fall. Guests to their agritourism operation make their way through a 15-acre corn maze cut in the shape of Extension’s centennial logo beginning Sept. 20.

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Aerial view of corn maze

Lee County corn maze
honors Extension centennial

Gross Farms in Lee County will join N.C. Cooperative Extension’s centennial celebration this fall. Guests to their agritourism operation make their way through a 15-acre corn maze cut in the shape of Extension’s centennial logo beginning Sept. 20.

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Growing our State postcard image

UNC-TV's North
Carolina Now features NC Cooperative Extension

North Carolina Cooperative Extension has been extending the knowledge and improving the lives of the state’s citizens since it was established in 1914 — growing North Carolina for 100 years! To commemorate the Centennial of NC Cooperative Extension, UNC-TV — North Carolina’s statewide public television network —will produce and broadcast a special series on NC’s only statewide weeknightly public affairs program, North Carolina Now. TUNE IN THURSDAYS AT 7:30 PM for these special stories throughout 2014: 4/24 — Youth and 4-H 5/29 — New Agriculture/Niche Marketing 6/26 — Environmental Stewardship 7/24 — Local Foods 8/28 — Disaster Preparedness 9/25 — Green Industry 10/30 — Food Safety 11/27 — Family Health and Nutrition 12/18 — Future of Cooperative Extension

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timeline

A century of
impact

North Carolina Cooperative Extension has been extending lives and changing lives for 100 years. Our online timeline provides a glimpse into our beginnings and the impact we've had on our state's economy, environment and quality of life.

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Then/Now Energy

Then and Now: From
Rural electrification to energy conservation to biofuels

Cooperative Extension programs related to energy and electricity have grown from early rural electrification efforts to include educational activities related to growing crops for biofuels, conserving energy at homes, as well as an annual 4-H Electric Congress. Here, a 1960s 4-H'er fixes a coffee percolator as part of an electricity demonstration. (photo from NCSU Libraries' Digital Program)[/caption] Then: Lighting up rural America: In the midst of the Great Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal included new programs to benefit farmers and conserve natural resources. One of these, the Rural Electrification Administration, aimed to encourage the extension of electrical lines into rural areas. In the 1930s, federal agencies turned to the land-grant colleges to help administer their programs, and at N.C. State, the organization was already in place to respond, as Extension workers and agents assisted in the logistics of bringing electric service to rural families. One of those leading the efforts was agricultural engineering specialist David S. Weaver, who would be called “the father of rural electrification in North Carolina.” On Sept. 15, 1935, in North Carolina, the rural electrification branch of the Extension service was created to help communities organize cooperatives and make use of electricity when it became available to their homes and farms. By 1939, 28.4 percent of the farms in the state had become electrified. And with electricity, other labor-savers arrived: In 1938, with Extension’s help, 1,885 home water systems were installed in 78 counties. Through the E-Conservation programs, Cooperative Extension’s Dr. Sarah Kirby and Amy Chilcote help homeowners be more efficient in their energy use. (Photo by Becky Kirkland)[/caption] Now: In 2005, the Cooperative Extension Service created the E-Conservation Program with funding from the State Energy Office to inform and educate North Carolina consumers about ways to both reduce energy use and increase energy efficiency in the home. This project is designed to educate and empower consumers to be proactive in reducing their home energy consumption and in saving money through no-and low-cost energy efficiency measures, behavioral changes and home retrofits. The Consumer Energy Education Project has been active since March 2005. Wilson County middle-schoolers follow the 4-H curriculum in conducting hands-on experiments on biofuel sources. (Photo Courtesy Amy Chilcote)[/caption] Meanwhile, Extension’s efforts in support of biofuels begin with its youth: 4-H, Extension’s youth education program, with assistance from the Biofuels Center of North Carolina, has worked to develop a national biofuels curriculum. The curriculum development is being led by North Carolina due to its strong program, good agricultural universities and Extension services, and biofuels leadership as a result of programs already rolled out by the Biofuels Center and other organizations. Moreover, as county middle schoolers took part in piloting the curriculum, one result was the prompting of interest in agricultural and biofuels careers. From helping consumers understand what they can do at home to conserve energy, to educating a range of ages about energy and alternative fuel sources, Extension’s work in this area continues to enrich the lives of North Carolina citizens.

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twitter campaign

Add to the centennial
chatter with Twitter

Cooperative Extension professionals and their clients nationwide are using social media to share their insights into the organization's history and its impact.

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Photo of the Week: Sept. 10, 2014 popular

Today, North Carolina Cooperative Extension’s forestry program supports an industry worth $24 billion a year to the state’s economy while helping communities manage their forests, homeowners take care of their trees and young people MORE »

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Clients tell Johnston County story

For the Johnston County Report to the People, county Extension professionals videotaped testimonials from clients describing how Extension had changed their lives. Watch YouTube MORE »

Ada Dalla Pozza

Pioneering Extension family educator dies

A pioneering educator who devoted decades to improving the lives of North Carolinians, especially its women and children, passed away Jan. 31 at the age of 91. Ada Braswell Dalla Pozza of Cary MORE »

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